Will Superhero Based Movies Lead to Movie Market Oversaturation?

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Answered by: Sean, An Expert in the Movies Category
Going to the movies is a time honored tradition for people of all ages. There you can go to escape the doldrums of reality for at least one-hundred and twenty minutes of air-chilled goodness. Take a date, take a friend, take an enemy, go by yourself, go with parents, enjoy alone time, relieve stress, the potential outlets of arrivals are endless. We entrust our mental capacities to gripping stories of excitement, fear, romantic adventure, and many other turbulent throes. A quality cinematic story can have a profound impact on an eclectic variety of outlets in the world.



Take for instance the everlasting effects of films like Star Wars, Toy Story, and the Avengers. They are all franchises that deal in facets that are different from each other. Their commonality? Their originality, their box office track records, their positive remarks from noted critics, their fiscal reaping for their producers' pockets, and their daring innovation.

The Avengers, one of the more recent movie time epics that's unfolding to the current generation, was the result of a formulation of not one or two, but five films prior to its release. Undeniably, it was a box office masterpiece with drawings upwards of $620 million dollars grossed in theaters. It was followed by a second Avengers feature that claimed a respectable draw of nearly $460 million dollars. However, the details are not in its earnings, but in its acquiescence. It too required four lead up movies to become existent, creative minds notwithstanding. On the horizon there are two further Avengers-esque movies with six films to go yet until we see their fruition. The quality of the majority of the films have been consistent but that can only last for so long. My question is how long until the movie audience grows weary of the continual bout of superhero flicks and movie market oversaturation sets in?



The varied success of each respective Marvel Studios film is a well documented manifest. It has also inspired DC comics to scramble to match its prevalence with plans in the works similar to the design of the Marvel agenda. Through the seemingly endless bouts of lead up and team movies and superhero mania induced by both sides, it begs the question of whether or not they will inadvertently wear out the superhero style of movie. As we have seen before in the 2000s era, vampires and zombies both had their due revitalization with all manners of period pieces, films, novelizations, and television dramas. Both brand of supernatural entity have since faded from the mainstream limelight after no small amount of exposure.

With about thirty-two genre movies released since 2000 and at least eleven more headed to the silver screen by the year 2020, it's not a far fetched idea that audiences may grow tired of the tacit formula. There has already been well founded accusation pointed at Marvel of foisting the "superhero origin and inevitable success" story line on the audiences. While a noted few have achieved groundbreaking accolades, the vast majority of the movies have actually been either forgettable or familiar. These castoff films can only serve the probable thought of movie market oversaturation.

Now, that is not to say that these movies are inherently bad. The ratio would favor the well reviewed versus the poor performers. The issue is truly with what will happen when the day comes for the superheros to disassemble. The profit margin for these movies are high and as any financier worth their salt can tell you: profits drive more than risks or originality. With movies more than likely planned out into the 2020s, what will happen when the public interest shifts? Will these studios keep churning out the same things or will they shift focus to stay atop the ball? If they don't, will they experience huge profit losses? And what will come next once the times have changed?

This is not aimed to rinse the theaters of caped crusaders or first avengers, but merely to incite introspection on the matter. There is precious little we as an audience can actually do about such a thing as we don't have a CEO tag on our lapel. It will certainly be an interesting few years in terms of superhero movies with all sides of the competition ramping up to top each other. Only time will tell whether superhero films will remain fresh and prevalent or if they will succumb to shifting sands.

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